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Egypt: Bomb suspects targeted US, French embassies

FILE - In this Wednesday May 8 2013 file phoEgyptian President Mohammed Morsi attends bi-lateral signing ceremony with Brazil's President

FILE - In this Wednesday, May 8, 2013 file photo, Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi attends a bi-lateral signing ceremony with Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff, at the Planalto presidential palace in Brasilia, Brazil. In their latest face-off with Egypt's Islamist rulers, the country's top council of judges decided Wednesday, May 15, 2013 to suspend its participation in a government-backed judicial reform conference following a renewed push by lawmakers on a controversial bill that would force thousands of their colleagues into retirement. The Supreme Judicial Council said in statement published by the state news agency MEAN that it was backing out of the "Justice Conference" expected for later this month. It had been sponsored by Egypt's Islamist President Morsi, and judges were supposed to come up with a plan to remake their institution. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres, File)

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CAIRO (AP) — Egyptian state prosecutors say three suspected al-Qaida-linked militants detained over the weekend were plotting to attack the U.S. and French embassies in Cairo using car bombs.

The prosecutors were quoted by the official MENA press agency on Wednesday.

Officials said when they announced the arrests Saturday that the men had been in contact with Dawood al-Assady, a leader of al-Qaida in southeast Asian countries, and that the group was planning suicide attacks on government buildings and a foreign embassy.

The interior minister denied that al-Qaida is active in Egypt, but said the three men were in contact with al-Qaida militants abroad.



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