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UN launches aerial attack on rebels in east Congo

Updated: November 17, 2012 4:48PM



KINSHASA, Congo — U.N. attack helicopters targeted M23 rebels in eastern Congo on Saturday after fighting resumed following a months-long lull in violence, a local official said.

Two army officers and 151 rebels were killed in a battle beginning Thursday that the U.N. called the worst clash between the M23 group and the military since July. Attack helicopters for the U.N. mission in Congo, known as MONUSCO, had been on standby.

“MONUSCO helicopters this morning bombarded the M23 positions in the city of Kibumba,” said North Kivu governor Julien Paluku. He said the Congolese army had earlier retreated from Kibumba, which is 30 kilometers (19 miles) north of Goma, after thousands of Rwandans, who he says were backing the rebels, attacked early Saturday.

“The fighting was very violent between the Congolese military and the M23 rebels backed by the Rwandan army,” he said. “Rwandan forces bombarded our positions in Kibumba since early this morning and an estimated 3,500 crossed the border to attack us.”

Reports by United Nations experts have accused Rwanda and Uganda of supporting the rebels. Both countries strongly deny any involvement and Uganda said if the charges continue it will pull its peacekeeping troops of Somalia where they are playing an important role in pushing out the Islamist extremist rebels.

At U.N. headquarters in New York, the Security Council held an emergency meeting Saturday afternoon at the request of France to discuss the flare-up of violence in eastern Congo.

“I do hope that we will get a signal from the council telling them, M23, to stop this advance,” said the French U.N. Ambassador Gerard Araud on his way into the chamber.

Araud called the violence “totally unacceptable” and urged the council to react “to put an end to this endless cycle of violence of which the civilians are the first victims.” He said France wanted the council to issue a press statement demanding that M23 stop its attacks and calling for “negotiations between all the countries concerned.”

The M23 was created after officers from the Congolese army defected in April and May and launched a rebellion to demand better pay, armaments and amnesty from war crimes.

Direct fighting broke out Thursday in Rugari, the town between the M23 and the Congolese army positions, only 30 kilometers (19 miles) from Goma, the provincial capital, and around 15 kilometers (9 miles)from Kanyaruchinya, a camp where more than 60,000 people have already sought refuge from the fighting since June.

The army spokesman in North Kivu, Col. Olivier Hamuli, said Friday that two army officers were killed and seven were wounded in the fighting in the Kibumba area.

M23 spokesman, Col. Vianney Kazarama, denied the heavy casualties, saying that only two rebels were wounded.

The U.N. peacekeeping mission in Congo said it was the worst battle since July. In New York, U.N. spokesman Martin Nesirky said there are indications that between 1,500 to 2,500 people may have fled the area as a result of the fighting.

Paluku said the country faces a humanitarian crisis as those displaced are moving toward Kanyaruchinya.

Since August, members of the International Conference for the Great Lakes Region have been holding talks in Kampala, Uganda, to try to find a solution to the conflict. There had been a de facto cease-fire during the mediation, but tensions mounted on the ground over the past two weeks as the talks seemed to be reaching a dead end.

The U.N. and the United States have both issued sanctions against the M23 leader, Sultani Makenga, who is accused of forcing children into the M23 ranks. The Congolese government said it welcomes sanctions against the M23 but estimates they are not sufficient.

Bosco Ntaganda, who is also thought to be leading the M23 rebellion, is under an International Criminal Court arrest warrant for similar war crimes.

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Associated Press writer Maria Sanminiatelli at the United Nations contributed to this report.



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