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Some conservatives would rather go over the ‘cliff’

President Barack Obamgestures as he answers questiabout fiscal cliff from reporters Wednesday Dec. 19 2012 White House Washington. (AP Photo/Charles

President Barack Obama gestures as he answers a question about the fiscal cliff from reporters, Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012, at the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

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Updated: January 27, 2013 6:23AM



BOSTON — In the city where a protest over tax policy sparked a revolution, modern-day Tea Party activists are cheering the recent Republican revolt in Washington that embarrassed House Speaker John Boehner and pushed the country closer to a “fiscal cliff” that forces tax increases and massive spending cuts on virtually every American.

“I want conservatives to stay strong,” says Christine Morabito, president of the Greater Boston Tea Party. “Sometimes things have to get a lot worse before they get better.”

Anti-tax conservatives from every corner of the nation echo her sentiment.

In more than a dozen interviews with the Associated Press, activists said they would rather the nation fall off the cliff than agree to a compromise that includes tax increases for any Americans, no matter their income.

They dismiss economists’ warnings that the automatic tax increases and deep spending cuts set to take effect Jan. 1 could trigger a fresh recession, and they overlook the fact that most people would see their taxes increase if President Barack Obama and Boehner fail to reach a year-end agreement.

The strong opposition among Tea Party activists and Republican leaders from New Hampshire to Wyoming and South Carolina highlights divisions within the GOP as well as the challenge that Obama and Boehner face in trying to get a deal done.

On Capitol Hill, some Republicans worry about the practical and political implications should the GOP block a compromise designed to avoid tax increases for most Americans and cut the nation’s deficit.

“It weakens the entire Republican Party, the Republican majority,” Rep. Steven LaTourette (R-Ohio) said Thursday night shortly after rank-and-file Republicans rejected Boehner’s “Plan B” — a measure that would have prevented tax increases on all Americans but million-dollar earners.

“I mean it’s the continuing dumbing down of the Republican Party, and we are going to be seen more and more as a bunch of extremists that can’t even get a majority of our own people to support policies that we’re putting forward,” LaTourette said. “If you’re not a governing majority, you’re not going to be a majority very long.”

It’s a concern that does not seem to resonate with conservatives such as Tea Party activist Frank Smith of Cheyenne, Wyo. He cheered Boehner’s failure as a victory for anti-tax conservatives and a setback for Obama, just six weeks after the president won re-election on a promise to cut the deficit in part by raising taxes on incomes exceeding $250,000.

Smith said his “hat’s off” to those Republicans in Congress who rejected their own leader’s plan.

“Let’s go over the cliff and see what’s on the other side,” the blacksmith said. “On the other side” are tax increases for most Americans, not just the top earners, though that point seemed lost on Smith, who added: “We have a day of reckoning coming, whether it’s next week or next year. Sooner or later the chickens are coming home to roost. Let’s let them roost next week.” AP



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