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Farrakhan son is part-time Harvey cop but hasn’t worked a shift in 4 years

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Updated: May 23, 2013 6:09AM



The Nation of Islam styles him its “Supreme Captain” — a potential successor to his controversial father, Minister Louis Farrakhan.

But when he’s working for the Harvey Police Department, Mustapha Farrakhan is just a regular part-time cop.

If, that is, he’s actually working for the Harvey Police Department.

Farrakhan, 52, certainly has a police badge from the crime-plagued south suburb.

He drives an unmarked Harvey Police squad car, complete with flashing police lights, and parks it outside his home at night.

And he’s been registered with the state as a gun-carrying Harvey cop since 2006.

But he hasn’t worked a single shift in more than four years, according to state records. If he’s ever made an arrest, Harvey’s police chief is unwilling to discuss it.

Officer Farrakhan does, though, appear to do “police work” off-duty, more than a dozen miles outside Harvey city limits, in Chicago, where he uses his Harvey squad car’s lights to stop traffic and escorts his father’s unofficial motorcade, a Chicago Sun-Times investigation has found.

The unusual arrangement that allows him to carry a concealed gun into places where regular citizens can’t, and to drive a police car, despite apparently failing to do regular police work for the suburb that employs him, may be especially useful to the man who leads the Nation of Islam’s “Fruit of Islam” security detail.

Neither Farrakhan, his close pal, Harvey Mayor Eric J. Kellogg, nor the Nation of Islam responded to requests last week to discuss it.

Harvey Police Chief Denard Eaves also declined to answer detailed questions about Farrakhan’s hire, his use of the city-owned squad car, or his security work for the country’s leading radical black Muslim.

Instead Eaves issued a statement describing Farrakhan as a “volunteer” police officer whose appointment he “stands behind.”

“Officer Farrakhan assists the Police Department with community relations, in its quest to strengthen ties between police and the community,” the chief wrote.

The statement does not address the fact that Farrakhan lives half an hour’s drive south of Harvey, in Crete.

It’s a statement the chief may have to expand upon. The Illinois Police Standards and Training Board this week opened an investigation into Farrakhan, the board’s deputy director, Larry Smith, said.

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Intrigue or controversy inside Harvey’s small police department is nothing new.

During the decade since Mayor Kellogg was elected, two officers have been convicted of felonies.

One, Kellogg’s close ally Archie Stallworth, was caught in a federal sting transporting what he thought was 30 kilos of cocaine.

The other, Detective Hollis Dorrough, illegally returned a gun taken in evidence to a suspect’s dad — on Kellogg’s orders, he claimed.

Civil lawsuits alleging police brutality and worse have also stacked up.

Just two months ago, the city agreed to pay $1.4 million to settle a lawsuit that alleged Kellogg and Dorrough conspired to frame a man after their stash of cocaine was stolen.

And in January, a federal jury awarded $600,000 to former Harvey cop Alex Gbur, who it found was sent out to face gunfire without his K-9 partner in an unsafe squad car as revenge for his support of one of Kellogg’s political opponents.

Faced with these and other embarrassing headlines, all of which he has denied, the mayor has long used his friendships with star athletes and other celebrities, including the Farrakhan family, to bolster his political appeal.

His relationship with Mustapha Farrakhan is especially close, sources say.

Though Minister Louis Farrakhan’s national influence has greatly diminished since he led the “Million Man March” on Washington, D.C., in 1995 — and some estimates put current active Nation of Islam membership as low as 2,000 — he remains a charismatic figure to many African Americans in the Chicago area.

As the highest-ranking of the minister’s sons in the Nation of Islam, Mustapha is one of a select group of insiders positioned to eventually take over from his 79-year-old father.

Supporters have touted his law enforcement experience with Harvey as a credential for the top spot.

Officer Farrakhan’s image also has benefitted from his son Mustapha Jr.’s status as a basketball star.

Currently a point guard in the NBA’s Development League, Minister Farrakhan’s grandson is a former star at Thornton Township, the Harvey high school where Kellogg once coached.

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Kellogg didn’t respond to questions sent last week to his spokeswoman, Sandra Alvarado, about the Harvey Police Department and his friendship with Officer Farrakhan.

But when the mayor enlisted as a Harvey cop back on Jan. 14, 2006, he told a reporter that it was because he was interested in “lifelong learning” and in improving Harvey’s police tactics.

State records show his friend Farrakhan began his training on the same date.

Once he had qualified as a sworn officer, Farrakhan worked just nine hours in the first half of 2007, upped his workload to 14 hours in the second half of that year, put in a yeoman-like 118 1/2 hours in the second half of 2008, before beginning an absence that continues to the present day, according to records Harvey Police filed with the state.

Farrakhan’s squad car, a black, high-mileage Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor, was purchased used from Palatine Police Department on Aug. 28, 2008 — right in the middle of his busiest period as a cop.

Records from the Illinois Secretary of State showed that Farrakhan signed the title over to the city, using the name “Wallace Farrakhan,” which he prefers on all official police documents.

The car, which has tinted windows and police lights mounted behind the grill and on the rear parcel shelf, was still parked in the cul-de-sac outside his home earlier this month when a Sun-Times photographer snapped a picture of it.

And it was tucked away in his four-car garage when a photographer returned last week.

But the squad got a far more public display last summer, when it lead Minister Farrakhan’s imposing, presidential-style motorcade of matching, black Hummer SUVs to several impromptu “walkabout” appearances on the South and West sides.

Videos of the visits posted on YouTube show the minister beaming beatifically beside his son and shaking hands with residents as a phalanx of sharp-suited, bow-tie-wearing Fruit of Islam security guards kept watch next to the squad car.

Officer Farrakhan is then shown in at least one of the videos using the squad car’s police lights to stop traffic and help his father’s motorcade make a dramatic exit.

To the casual observer, it was indistinguishable from an undercover Chicago Police escort. But the clearly visible license plate was registered to the City of Harvey.

Official Chicago Police escorts are normally reserved for high-ranking public officials and foreign dignitaries. They typically have to be cleared by the Department’s Special Events and Liaison Unit, according to Chicago Police spokesman Adam Collins. But “the CPD does not provide Louis Farrakhan with a motorcade,” Collins said, and it “doesn’t have any record of such a request.”

Illinois law does allow police officers to use their powers anywhere in the state, according to John Millner, a former Republican state senator, Elmhurst Police chief and head of the Illinois Police Chief’s Association.

But by custom, cops are supposed to use their powers outside their jurisdiction only in an emergency, in areas immediately contiguous to their jurisdiction, or at the invitation of the department whose area they’re in, he said.

More to the point, Millner said, he would like to know, “Who is Louis Farrakhan to have a motorcade?

“Why are Harvey taxpayers paying for a vehicle to protect someone who doesn’t even live in their community?”

He adds: “What is the nexus between this man’s security work for the Nation of Islam, and his employment as a Harvey police officer?”



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