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CTA Red Line service resumes after train ends up on two tracks

CTA Red Line trains are stopped both directions between Belmont Howard following derailment North Side Edgewater neighborhood Monday Oct. 1

CTA Red Line trains are stopped in both directions between Belmont and Howard following a derailment in the North Side Edgewater neighborhood Monday Oct. 1 2012. | Courtesy NBC5

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Updated: November 3, 2012 6:13AM



North Side commuters avoided a nightmare Monday when the Chicago Transit Authority restored service to the Red Line less than two hours after a southbound train’s front wheels switched to the wrong track north of Granville early in the afternoon.

The CTA stopped service on the Red Line between Howard and Addison and temporarily suspended Yellow Line service, loading passengers on shuttle buses and using social media to urge others to consider other routes.

Trains began running again about 2:20 p.m., not that it was much comfort to frustrated riders such as Angela Banks, of , Edgewater, who got off at the Granville stop after being stuck between Belmont and Fullerton for about half an hour.

“They just kept playing the same stupid recording over again, ‘maintenance on the tracks,’ ” said Banks, who stopped to talk only briefly because she was in a hurry to pick up her son.

The delay was caused by a switching problem that left a southbound Red Line train, approaching the Granville station at 12:48 p.m., with its front wheels on one track and back wheels on another.

CTA officials insisted the train did not derail because its wheels never left the tracks. No injuries were reported.

Sahil Vaid was stuck near Belmont on another train for about 20 minutes while the other train was put back on track. His classes at Loyola University had ended for the day, but he said others on his car clearly needed to get where they were going on time.

“I hope they did,” Vaid said.

George Dzikunoo, an engineer from Evanston, hopped onto a northbound Red Line train shortly after service was restored. He was unfazed by the interruption — though he said his shuttle bus was way too crowded — because he knows problems can occur “once in a great while” no matter how well tracks are laid.

“It’s just part of the territory,” Dzikunoo said.



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