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Dawn Clark Netsch’s career highlights

Dawn Clark Netsch August 27 2009. | Brian Jackson~Chicago Sun-Times

Dawn Clark Netsch, August 27, 2009. | Brian Jackson~Chicago Sun-Times

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netsch career highlights

Dawn Clark Netsch — who’s going public with her fight against the degenerative condition ALS — has been a trailblazer during more than six decades in politics, law and government. Among her accomplishments:

1952 — Graduated first in her class from Northwestern University Law School. She returned there in 1965 as one of the first female law school professors in the nation.

1961 — Joined the staff of Gov. Otto Kerner Jr. — the first woman to be legal adviser to an Illinois governor.

1970 — Was an architect of the current Illinois constitution.

1972 — Took on and dealt a defeat to Chicago’s Democratic machine by beating incumbent state Sen. Danny O’Brien. She went on to serve 18 years in the Illinois Senate, where she became known as an expert on state finance, championed ethics and campaign-finance reforms, argued against the death penalty and sponsored the Equal Rights Amendment.

1990 — Elected comptroller — the first woman to win statewide office in Illinois.

1994 — Was the first woman to run as a major party candidate for governor in Illinois, losing to Republican incumbent Gov. Jim Edgar.

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Updated: March 5, 2013 9:34AM



Dawn Clark Netsch — who’s going public with her fight against the degenerative condition ALS — has been a trailblazer during more than six decades in politics, law and government. Among her accomplishments:

1952 — Graduated first in her class from Northwestern University Law School. She returned there in 1965 as one of the first female law school professors in the nation.

1961 — Joined the staff of Gov. Otto Kerner Jr. — the first woman to be legal adviser to an Illinois governor.

1970 — Was an architect of the current Illinois constitution.

1972 — Took on and dealt a defeat to Chicago’s Democratic machine by beating incumbent state Sen. Danny O’Brien. She went on to serve 18 years in the Illinois Senate, where she became known as an expert on state finance, championed ethics and campaign-finance reforms, argued against the death penalty and sponsored the Equal Rights Amendment.

1990 — Elected comptroller — the first woman to win statewide office in Illinois.

1994 — Was the first woman to run as a major party candidate for governor in Illinois, losing to Republican incumbent Gov. Jim Edgar.



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