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Buttermilk: What it is why to use it beyond breakfast

This undated image shows buttermilk-soaked pork tenderlocutlet sandwiches Concord N.H. The acid buttermilk also helps tenderize meat. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

This undated image shows buttermilk-soaked pork tenderloin cutlet sandwiches in Concord, N.H. The acid in the buttermilk also helps to tenderize the meat. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

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Updated: January 13, 2013 6:03AM



The problem with buttermilk is there isn’t a lot of “real” buttermilk around.

The good news is that the newfangled buttermilk available at most grocers isn’t all that bad. Better yet, it’s easy to make the real stuff yourself.

But first, a buttermilk primer. As its name suggests, buttermilk is the tangy milk-like liquid left behind when cultured cream is churned to make butter. At least that’s how they made it in the old days. Today, it’s usually commercially produce by adding cultures (think the bacteria that produces yogurt) to low- or no-fat milk.

Either way, you end up with an acidic, thick, milky liquid. But why is this considered an ingredient that’s off the beaten aisle? After all, we’ve all had buttermilk pancakes and waffles. It’s because what most people don’t realize is just how versatile an ingredient buttermilk is. And it belongs on the dinner table as much as at breakfast.

Let’s start with buttermilk’s signature tang. It’s tangy because it’s acidic, and acidic ingredients make for great marinades. Give chicken, pork or turkey a buttermilk bath and you’ll get especially tender, flavorful meat. Before you add the meat, just whisk in whatever seasonings you want.

And that same tang turns out killer mashed potatoes. Use it in place of regular milk, then mash away. Ditto for sweet potatoes.

Next time you’re making a vinaigrette for your salad or roasted vegetables, add buttermilk for rich, luxurious flavor. Try a blend of olive oil, buttermilk, lemon juice, strawberry jam, salt and black pepper.

Buttermilk also is delicious in fruit smoothies. Substitute buttermilk for a quarter to half of the liquid you’d normally use.

When shopping for buttermilk, most of what you find at the grocer is labeled “cultured buttermilk,” which generally refers to low-fat or skim milk that has been cultured. But a number of regional dairies now sell “real” buttermilk, a smart use of the liquid leftover from their butter making operations.

But it’s also easy enough to make your own. And the best part is that in the process, you also get some delicious homemade butter (the very best there is). Just purchase a pint of the very best quality heavy cream you can find. Place it in a food processor and process for several minutes.

The cream will get thick and resemble whipped cream. Continue processing until the whipped cream breaks and the fat solids come together as butter. At this point there should be one or two large clumps of butter and a fair amount of milky liquid in the processor. Pour off the liquid — this is your buttermilk. Season the butter with salt, then use or refrigerate. It’s that simple.

AP



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