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A woman’s walk tells a lot about how she is in the bedroom

Updated: October 27, 2011 5:50PM



It is not uncommon for men to slyly watch attractive women as they walk down the street, especially in a city like Chicago where beautiful women are at every turn. However, a recent study out of Belgium suggests that a woman’s walk is more than just a tempting way for her to strut her stuff. It also is a way for keen observers to detect her orgasmic history.

According to the researchers, a woman’s walk gives off subtle clues that can belie her sexual experience. The study found that observers were able to detect whether a woman had a history of vaginal orgasm through traditional intercourse simply by watching her cross the street. The findings state that women who walk with “fluidity, energy, sensuality, freedom and absence of both flaccid and locked muscles” were more likely to have a history of vaginal orgasm than women who did not display these characteristics in their walk.

While these findings make sense, it is a case of the chicken vs. the egg: Which came first, a woman’s sensual, free walk, or her habit of reaching vaginal orgasm? I think the former. A woman who walks with confidence, ease and a bit of sex appeal is likely more in tune with her sexual needs and her body, meaning that reaching vaginal orgasm is easier for her than for someone who might be more self-conscious and inhibited as she walks down the street. A woman who isn’t comfortable in her own skin outside the bedroom isn’t likely to be comfortable in the bedroom. She will likely be more inhibited and disassociated from her physical sensations during sex, all of which will complicate the process of attaining vaginal orgasm (which is notoriously harder to reach than clitoral orgasm for most women).

For those of you who are a little confused by the term “vaginal” and “clitoral” orgasm, you are not alone. Many people don’t realize that women can have three distinct forms of orgasm. These include clitoral orgasm (in which a woman reaches orgasm outside the vagina, generally through clitoral stimulation), vaginal orgasm (in which a woman reaches orgasm inside the vagina, generally through stimulation of the G-spot), and a blended orgasm (in which a woman attains both a vaginal and clitoral orgasm at the same time).

Although a blended orgasm will offer a woman plenty of pleasure, the truth is that all orgasms are created equal. It is risky to suggest that one type of orgasm is better than another, or that women who don’t reach vaginal orgasm easily are less sexually attune than women who do. Freud himself once described a clitoral orgasm as “immature,” suggesting that vaginal orgasms are the true goal of sexual fulfillment. Talk about pressure! Women often have a hard enough time relaxing and enjoying sex without feeling like their natural responses are “immature” or not good enough.

In my mind, there is no type of orgasm that is preferable to another, and to imply otherwise is to complicate a woman’s sexual experience. Women all have different sexual needs and desires, and even though they have the same “hot spots” such as the clitoris and the G-spot, they don’t always interpret stimulation in the same way. This is all a natural part of the human sexual experience, and as long as you are having fulfilling, frequent orgasms, there is no reason to stress over your orgasmic experience. As I always say, an orgasm is an orgasm is an orgasm.

Orgasm history aside, every woman should walk with confidence and ease. Tune in to your body and notice the way you move. Walk consciously and put a little spring in your step. Tighten your core and gently sway your hips. Not only will you catch the eye of the cute guy across the street, but you also will be more attuned to your body and your movement within the bedroom as well.



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