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Wife doesn’t want him to see friends

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Updated: December 29, 2013 10:27PM



Dear Abby: I have been married to my wife for a year and a half, and we have an infant child. I work while my wife stays home. My problem is she doesn’t like me playing sports and hanging out with friends.

I have tried to make concessions and cut down playing sports to once a week. (I used to play two or three times a week, but that’s not good enough for my wife.) On game night, when I get home she gives me the silent treatment. She used to come to my games but won’t now, even though she has girlfriends who attend them.

As for hanging out with my friends, I barely see them anymore — and when I do, they come here. If they stay any longer than 30 minutes, it causes a problem and my wife again won’t talk to me for the rest of the night.

I have tried to compromise, but she feels as though any time I spend away from her and the baby is a no-no. Am I wrong to want to play sports and see my guy friends? — ONTARIO, CANADA, READER

DEAR READER: You should not become a couch potato or become isolated from your friends because you are married and a parent. And neither should your wife. She may resent the time you spend with your friends because she’s stuck at home taking care of the baby. You are her only adult company, and in a way she may be jealous that you’re enjoying freedom that she can’t.

Your wife should not be doing all the parenting. One day or evening a week you should take care of the baby while she takes a break with her friends or family. It could do wonders for your relationship.

If you can agree on this, it could save your marriage. If you can’t, then the two of you should get counseling. Marriage isn’t supposed to put people in isolation — and that’s what it appears your wife is trying to accomplish with you.

Dear Abby: For the past 10 years, the holiday season has brought with it arguments between my wife and me. We both get along with our in-laws and do many things with both sides of our families. But for some reason, my wife makes arrangements for the holidays without discussing them with me first. This year, she told her mom we would host Thanksgiving and that I would have to tell my family we wouldn’t be coming to them.

My wife’s sisters are not close to their in-laws. Am I wrong to think she should have discussed the matter with me before deciding unilaterally what we’re doing for the holidays? Our kids need to see all their grandparents on Thanksgiving and Christmas. Oh — our parents live only seven minutes from each other. — HOLIDAY BLUES IN WISCONSIN

DEAR HOLIDAY BLUES: What your wife did was inconsiderate. You are a couple, and she should have discussed her plan with you before issuing any invitations to see if you were in agreement. If your home is too small to accommodate both sets of in-laws at the same time, a compromise would be to alternate holidays with each set so no family feels excluded.

Dear Abby: Is it acceptable to wear a silver dress to a wedding if you are going as a guest and not a member of the bridal party? Or is silver too close to white and therefore taboo? — INVITEE IN COLLEGE PARK, MD.

DEAR INVITEE: The rule is that wedding guests should not wear anything that might distract attention from the bride. If your dress is silver lame or covered in silver sequins, it would be better to dress less conspicuously.



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