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Robin Thicke, Chaka Khan, Charlie Wilson headline V103 anniversary show

RobThicke wants head back recording studio but first he's headed Chicago this weekend for concert. | AP

Robin Thicke wants to head back to the recording studio, but first he's headed to Chicago this weekend for a concert. | AP

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V103 25th
ANNIVERSARY
CONCERT

When: Doors open 6 p.m.
Saturday

Where: Allstate Arena,
6920 N. Mannheim, Rosemont

Tickets : $49-$125

Info: Visit v103.com or
ticketmaster.com

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Updated: November 6, 2013 6:06AM



As the dust presumably settles on “Blurred Lines,” singer Robin Thicke is making one thing perfectly clear in a recent interview with the Associated Press: He’d like to hit the studio to record a “country album, a Christmas album, a gospel album! ... I’m ready to make four albums
right now.”

But first, he’s headed to Chicago for Saturday’s V103-FM 25th anniversary concert at the Allstate Arena. The lineup also features Bell Biv Devoe, Charlie Wilson and Chaka Khan.

And as the radio station celebrates the milestone, Herb “The Cool Gent” Kent — the city’s longest-running voice on urban radio and a V103 (WVAZ-FM) DJ since 1989 — will be celebrating a personal milestone: He turns 85 on Saturday.

He is a voice from a grand canyon of soul.

The lines are not that blurred between old school and the contemporary sound of Thicke, which draws on ’70s disco rhythms.

“If I was a writer I would step back to get some of the old stuff too,” Kent said. “Because what is old is new.”

V103 targets a 25 to 54 age group. Derrick Brown, director of urban programming (V103, WGCI and Inspiration 1390) said, “We’re in for the whole family. The music that we play brings back memories and creates new ones.”

But the influence of hip-hop and rap cannot be ignored in the evolution of rhythm and blues.

Kent explained, “Music reflects how we live. It was time for rap. I don’t know if God sends it to us or what, but I remember when [The Sugar Hill Gang’s] ‘Rapper’s Delight’ came in (1979), I had never seen anything hit like that. Music reflects what we’re doing, but it is good to go back to the dusties and revisit times gone by.”

dhoekstra@suntimes.com

@cstdhoekstra



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