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Greece approved to get next rescue loan payments

Italian Finance Minister Fabrizio Saccomanni right talks with International Monetary Fund managing director Christine Lagarde left Irish Finance Minister Michael

Italian Finance Minister Fabrizio Saccomanni, right, talks with International Monetary Fund managing director Christine Lagarde, left, and Irish Finance Minister Michael Noonan, during the Eurogroup meeting, at the European Council building in Brussels, Monday, July 8, 2013. The finance ministers of the 17 European countries that use the euro are expected to approve the release of another installment of the rescue funds that Greece has been relying on since May 2010. (AP Photo/Yves Logghe)

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BRUSSELS — Greece secured a much-needed 6.8 billion euros ($8.7 billion) in rescue loans Monday after squeaking by an inspection from its international creditors, who are demanding it slash thousands of civil servant jobs and government spending.

Experts from the European Central Bank, the European Union and the International Monetary Fund said Greece’s finances are improving, although they warned that it is making reforms too slowly and that the outlook for its economy, which has been in recession since 2007, remains uncertain.

But the so-called troika of creditors still recommended that the next loan payments be made, and the finance ministers from the 17 countries that use the euro agreed. Belgian Finance Minister Koen Geens said the loans would be divided into three groups and disbursed in July, August and October.

“Greece is getting on track,” German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble said as he left the meeting in Brussels. “It is not easy for them.”

After years of overspending, Greece nearly went bankrupt and is now surviving on rescue loans. To ensure that the government keeps up with the reforms it promised in exchange for 240 billion euros in bailout loans, its creditors turn over the funds slowly — and only after rigorous assessments of the country’s progress.

Greece’s creditors said the country’s reform program remained “broadly in line” with projections. It also laid out the hope of a gradual return to growth next year.

However, it added that “the outlook remains uncertain.” Greece has been hammered by a financial crisis since 2009 and is in the sixth year of a deep recession.

The troika said “policy implementation is behind in some areas” and that the Greek authorities have said they will do more to ensure delivery of the fiscal targets for 2013-14, noting in particular efforts to restrict overspending in the health sector.

“In short, it is time to step up the momentum of reform in Greece, support the return of confidence for the sake of sustainable growth and job creation,” said the EU’s monetary affairs commissioner, Olli Rehn.

Greece is stuck in a years-long recession and unemployment has spiraled to above 27 percent, in part because of the reforms and austerity measures it is implementing.

The troika said the government has also “committed to take steps to bring public administration reforms back on track,” including reducing the number of civil servants, one of the measures that has been among the most contentious in Greece’s reform program.

“Firing civil servants is always difficult, that is difficult in every country, certainly in such economic circumstances,” said Jeroen Dijsselbloem, who is head of the eurogroup meeting and Dutch finance minister.

The government must put 12,500 civil servants on administrative leave by the end of the year, with the possibility of dismissal. They include 2,200 school security personnel; 3,500 members of the Athens municipal police, which will then be disbanded and absorbed into Greece’s police force; at least 2,000 local government employees; 1,500 teachers; and employees of various ministries.

They will be paid 75 percent of their normal salary and be subject to dismissal if they aren’t transferred to other state agencies within eight months.

Municipal workers across the country went on strike to protest the plan, while the country’s civil servants union, ADEDY, called a work stoppage from noon for all civil servants in the capital, Athens.

The austerity reforms agreed in return for the loans, have included big salary and pension cuts as well as repeated tax hikes.

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Elena Becatoros from Athens, Greece, contributed to this report.



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