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Cars avoid crashes by ‘communicating’ with each other

In this photaken Tuesday May 22 2012 professional test driver J.D. Ellis Cincinnati Ohio demonstrates dashboard warning signal Ford Taurus

In this photo taken, Tuesday, May 22, 2012, professional test driver J.D. Ellis of Cincinnati, Ohio, demonstrates the dashboard warning signal in a Ford Taurus, at an automobile testing area in Oxon Hill, Md. The display at a recent transportation conference was a peek into the future of automotive safety: cars that to talk to each other and warn drivers of impending collisions. Later this summer, the government is launching a yearlong, real-world test involving nearly 3,000 cars, trucks and buses using volunteer drivers in Ann Arbor, Mich. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

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Updated: July 12, 2012 6:10AM



As a safety demonstration, a Ford Taurus was seconds away from cruising through an intersection when suddenly a row of red lights pulsed on the lower windshield and a warning blared that another car was approaching fast on the cross street.

Braking quickly, the driver stopped just as the second car, previously unseen behind a large parked truck, barreled through a red light and across the Ford’s path.

The display at a recent transportation conference was a peek into the future of automotive safety: cars that to talk to each other and warn drivers of impending collisions. Later this summer, the government is launching a yearlong, real-world test involving nearly 3,000 vehicles using volunteer drivers in Ann Arbor, Mich.

The vehicles will be equipped to communicate over wireless networks, exchanging information on location, direction and speed 10 times a second with other similarly equipped cars within about 1,000 feet. A computer analyzes the information and issues danger warnings to drivers, often before they can see the other vehicle.

On roadways today, the Taurus in the demonstration likely would have been “T-boned” — slammed in the side by the other car.

Called vehicle-to-vehicle communication, or V2V, more advanced versions of the systems can take control of a car to prevent an accident by applying brakes when the driver reacts too slowly to a warning.

AP



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