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It’s Kenya’s Moses Mosop! And a record

Updated: October 9, 2011 10:15AM



9:48 A.M. UPDATE:

Russia’s Liliya Shobukhova, 33, wins the women’s portion of the 2011 Bank of America Chicago Marathon, the first woman ever to win back-to-back-to-back Chicago Marathons.

Her unofficial time was 2:18:20. The track star gave her trademark sprint finish. She wins $100,000.

Her personal best was 2:20:15. For women, the course record is Paula Radcliffe’s 2:17:18 from 2002. Radcliffe also holds the world record of 2:15:25 in London in 2003.

“I’m unbelievably happy,” she said through a translator after the race. As for becoming part of Chicago Marathon history, she said “it’s something special.”

“Everything feels great,” she said.

9:43 A.M. UPDATE:

Kenya’s Moses Mosop wins the 2011 Bank of Marathon Chicago Marathon with a course record time of 2:05:37.

He wins $100,000 for finishing first, and another $50,000 for breaking the course record.

Coming in second was Wesley Korir, 28, from Kenya. He won the Los Angeles Marathon in 2009 and 2010.

Third place went to Bernard Kipyego, 25, also from Kenya.

“Yesterday I didn’t think I was in good shape,” Mosop said after the race. But, he added, “I’m very happy about the job I [did] today.”

Mosop vomited immediately after finising the race.

He gave a shout-out to the spectators in Chicago for “cheering me a lot.”

“I got a lot of energy” from the crowd reaction, he said.

9:35 A.M. UPDATE:

Kenya’s Moses Mosop, 26, has won the 2011 Bank of Marathon Chicago Marathon — and $150,000 — with a course record time of 2:05:37.

The old record was the late Sammy Wanjiru’s 2:05:41 from 2009.

Mosop — who ran his first marathon in Boston earlier this year and finished in 2:03:06, the fastest marathon ever run by a first-timer and the second fastest marathon time ever — had told reporters before the Chicago race that he had a sore achilles tendon. That did not apppear to slow him as he led for much of the final third.

Mosop had said before the race: “I want to run a 2:02 in Chicago,” said Mosop.

Mosop runs 15 miles every morning and evening to train.

9:27 A.M. UPDATE:

Russia’s Liliya Shobukhova is on pace for a 2:18:30 first-place finish for the women. Her personal best is 2:20:15. For women, the course record is Paula Radcliffe’s 2:17:18 from 2002. Radcliffe also holds the world record of 2:15:25 in London in 2003.

9:25 A.M. UPDATE:

Kenya’s Moses Mosop, who was battling an Achilles injury, has built a dominating lead. He’s in the home stretch, having run about 25 miles.

9:19 A.M. UPDATE:

Kenya’s Moses Mosop has a 26-second lead. He’s on pace to finish at 2:04:33, which would be a course record. He’s at mile 24.

9:14 A.M. UPDATE:

Tatyana McFadden, 22, a student at the University of Illinois, wins the women’s wheelchair portion of the Chicago Marathon. She was born in Russia and battles spina bifida. “It’s a tough course,” she told NBC5 after her win. “It wasn’t really windy.”

9:12 A.M. UPDATE:

Russia’s Liliya Shobukhova is in the lead for the women in the Bank of America Chicago Marathon.

9:07 A.M. UPDATE:

Kenya’s Moses Mosop, in Chinatown, is on a pace for a 2:04:30 finish. The Chicago course record is the late Sammy Wanjiru’s 2:05:41 from 2009. Patrick Makau of Kenya holds the men’s world record. He ran 2:03:30 on Sept. 25 in Berlin.

9:02 A.M. UPDATE:

Kenya’s Moses Mosop is now in the lead of a quickly diminishing pack of elite runners. His personal best is 2:03:06.

8:58 A.M. UPDATE:

Kenyan Wesley Korir, 28, has moved to the front of the pack. Ethiopian Tilahun Regassa, a pace setter, has dropped back. Korir is on a pace of 2:05:00.

8:55 A.M. UPDATE:

Pacer Jonathan Maiyo has dropped out. Ethiopian Tilahun Regassa is leading the pack. Moses Mosop right behind.

8:50 A.M. UPDATE:

The winner of the wheelchair portion of the Chicago Marathon is Kurt Fearnley of Australia. He was the Chicago Marathon champion in 2007, 2008 and 2009. He won the New York Marathon in 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009. He won the gold medal in the 2008 Paralympics in Beijing.

He was born without the lower portion of his spine.

Fearnley wasn’t at last year’s race. “It’s good to be back,” he said, describing the contest as “just a crackin’ race.”

8:35 A.M. UPDATE:

Mile 12: projected finish: 2:05:38

Leaders are the pacers Kenyans Edward Muge, Jonathan Maiyo, Onarda McDonard and Ethiopian Tilahun Regassa.

8:30 A.M. UPDATE:

The elite runners in the 34th Annual Bank of America Chicago Marathon tore through River North, headed south on Orleans, across the Franklin Street Bridge over the Chicago River.

8:25 A.M. UPDATE:

Nearly an hour into the 34th Annual Bank of America Chicago Marathon, the lead runner is Jonathon Maiyo, followed closely in the pack by Kenya’s Moses Mosop and American Ryan Hall.

8 A.M. UPDATE:

Thirty minutes into the 34th Annual Bank of America Chicago Marathon, the elite runners were near Lincoln Park Zoo. The lead pack included American Ryan Hall and Kenyan Moses Mosop.

•••••••••••••

Tens of thousands of runners — and an estimated 1 million spectators — have descended on Chicago for the 34th Annual Bank of America Chicago Marathon.

Wheelchair racers got it underway at 7:20. Ten minutes later, the elite runners and thousands more hit the streets to the blaring sound of Bruce Springsteen’s “Born to Run.”

They’ll wind through 29 Chicago neighborhoods and end up back in Grant Park.

Gov. Pat Quinn will be at the finish line.

Temperatures are expected to reach about 80 degrees today — but it was 66 degrees at 7 a.m., and temps were not expected to reach the expected high until after the race.

At the starting line were old pros — and first-timers, like Nancy Weisse.

The 34-year-old first grade teacher from Aurora and mother of three is being cheered on by her students. “All the kids tell me, ‘We’re going to watch you on TV. We hope you win.’

“It’s a strange calm just sitting here,” she said before the start of the race. “But once the race starts, I think we’ll be ready.”

More than 45,000 people are registered to take on the 26.2 mile course. For the vast majority, the course record is not in play. But for the elite, the number to match on the Chicago course is Sammy Wanjiru’s 2:05:41 from 2009.

For women, the course record is Paula Radcliffe’s 2:17:18 from 2002. That was a world record for the British runner at the time. It didn’t stand. But the world record still belongs to Radcliffe: 2:15:25 in London in 2003.

Patrick Makau of Kenya holds the men’s world record. He ran 2:03:30 on Sept. 25 in Berlin.

Likely contenders to win — if not to set world records — include Moses Mosop of Kenya (personal best of 2:03:06) and Ryan Hall of the United States (2:04:58) for the men and two-time defending Chicago champion Liliya Shobukhova of Russia (2:20:15) for the women.

Many of the runners are participating for charity.

Among those are some very recognizable faces — U.S. soccer players Hope Solo, Abby Wambach and Alex Morgan. Their marathon bibs featured their first names instead of numbers. They are running in a relay, with each running about two miles.

“It’s all about teammwork,” Morgan said just before the race. “We showed that during the World Cup.”

Stephen “Sven” Johnson, 35, from the Champaign area, is running for Imerman Angels. Dressed like an angel — including a pink hat with angel wings — he said his wife, Leslie Hammersmith, is a breast cancer survivor. It’s his fifth marathon — and he’s raised $3,000 this year.

Thousands of banana peels filled the trash cans around Grant Park before the 7:30 a.m. start as runners got a final pre-race energy boost.

At the start line, thousands of spectators armed with cow bells and signs climbed walls and claimed every available high point to see the runners off.

A loud cheer echoed across Grant Park when Hall, a U.S. fan favorite, was introduced. Then an anxious hush fell, a air horn signaled the start of the 26.2 mile ordeal and the crowd erupted again as family members and friends called out to their loved ones.

Among them was St. Louis resident Alissa Taylor, toting a two-foot wide cardboard cut out of her brother Justen Mayer’s face, mounted on a long wooden pole.

“He didn’t know we were making the trip, so the sign is a surprise for him,” she said. “I hope it keeps him going.”

Mayer is running to raise cash for pancreatic cancer research, after the disease claimed their father William Mayer’s life in 2004, she said.

As thousands of runners, many from out of town, poured into the Loop headed for the marathon start, volunteers were on hand to give directions.

Near Congress and Michigan Avenue, a runner with a bunch of gelpacks tucked into his shorts relieved himself in the bushes overlooking the railroad tracks. “It’s part of the marathon experience,” he said to some spectators as he clambered back onto Michigan Avenue.

Just before the start lines were 35 deep for each portable toilet.

James Deddens, 29 from Dayton, Ohio, was worried about the heat. “Knowing it was a warm night beforehand it’s going to be a pretty hot day but hopefully I’ll finish before 11:30 or so before the heat gets too bad.”

It was Deddens’ third Chicago Marathon. “It’s a well-run course, they have a lot of water and aid stations. It’s a good atmosphere and I like running through all the neighborhoods.”

For Mary Grimm, 48, it’s her first Chicago Marathon. “I’m hoping it’s not too hot. We’re from St. Louis and I’ve been training in the heat so I think I’ll be OK. I’m hoping to be under five hours. Just finishing is a goal.”

For support she brought along her husband Mike and three teenage daughters. “They like Chicago and we spent the day shopping yesterday so they were happy to come,” she said of her daughters.



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